Identifying patients whose driving ability will likely be impaired by early stage dementia

The automobile has always been more than just as a means of transportation for many people, often a sign of independence, power, individualism and control. It is why it is so difficult for people who must confront the day when they are no longer competent to drive to relinquish their keys.

What system of evaluation should be in place to ensure public safety and balance the needs of the driver? This question is multifaceted and covers issues pertaining to driver skill and experience, the effects of chronic diseases, and the effects of aging.

Researchers from Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre have released a study published in the September 12, 2006 issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal that could help doctors identify patients whose driving ability will likely be impaired by dementia in the early stages.

  • Dr. Mark Rapoport, assistant professor in the department of psychiatry in the geriatric psychiatry division at the University of Toronto, clinical scientist at Sunnybrook and Women’s and head of the Geriatric Mild-to-Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic at Sunnybrook & Women’s and co-author of this study.
help doctors identify patients whose driving ability will likely be impaired by dementia in the early stages

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